In case of an emergency, please call: 03457 444 999

If there is a fire, please call: 999

Emergency procedures

General advice

  • If you suspect a leak, ring the Calor Emergency Service on 03457 444 999 but call 999 immediately if there is any sort of fire
  • Carefully assess the situation before approaching
  • Wear the right personal protection equipment, including clothing
  • Ensure there is a safe route of access and escape available
  • Stay upwind of any fire or escaping LPG
  • Avoid coming into contact with the LPG, as it can cause severe cold burns and saturate clothing which may subsequently catch fire
  • NOTE: Any vessel involved in a fire may suddenly rupture. Change in the size or noise of the fire may be an indication, but there may be no warning. IF IN DOUBT, DO NOT APPROACH.
  • Shut all the valves on the tank/cylinders and the emergency control valve outside your house by turning them clockwise, if it is safe to do so
  • Call the fire brigade immediately and tell them that LPG is involved
  • Keep the tank or cylinders cool by spraying with water – if it is possible and safe to do so
  • Establish an exclusion zone around the incident
  • Leaks may be identified by smell, noise or frost at the source, by soapy water or a gas detector
  • NEVER SEARCH FOR LEAKS WITH A NAKED FLAME
  • Do not use electrical switches
  • Isolate the leak by turning off all the valves on the tank/cylinders and the emergency control valve outside your house
  • If the vessel is portable, move it to a safe place if possible
  • Open all doors and windows for ventilation
  • For large leaks, use water sprays to assist dispersal of LPG gas and protect vulnerable vessels
  • Cut off or reduce the supply of fuel at source, wherever possible
  • Call the fire brigade immediately and tell them that LPG is involved
  • Check the contents indicator and pressure gauge on the tank, if fitted
  • Turn off the gas tap at each appliance
  • Shut all the valves on the tank/cylinders and the emergency control valve outside your home by turning them clockwise
  • Restrict access to the area
  • Close available valves to isolate the vessel
  • Limit the pressure by spraying with water until the damage can be assessed

Carbon monoxide safety

Once referred to as the 'silent killer', carbon monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas that is colourless, odourless and tasteless

On average, 30 people in the UK die every year from CO poisoning, with many more suffering from its symptoms. Here's how you can protect yourself and your family:

Carbon monoxide is formed by the incomplete combustion of carbon-containing fuels, such as gas (mains or LPG), coal, oil, coke and wood. Gas fires, stoves, heating boilers, gas-powered water heaters, paraffin heaters and solid fuel-powered water heaters are all potential sources of CO.

CO can be produced:

  • If an appliance isn’t working or properly installed
  • If an appliance hasn’t been properly maintained or regularly serviced
  • If your living area has inadequate ventilation
  • If the chimney or flue is blocked
  • If non-Gas Safe registered engineers are used to install or maintain appliances

The warning signs include:

  • Yellow or brown staining on or around the appliance
  • Pilot lights that frequently blow out
  • Increased condensation inside windows
  • Yellow rather than blue flame (apart from flueless fires)
  • Frequent headaches, nausea or dizziness when an appliance is in use

If you suspect carbon monoxide you should:

  • Switch off the appliance IMMEDIATELY
  • Open all doors and windows
  • Increased condensation inside windows
  • Yellow rather than blue flame (apart from flueless fires)

 

  • Invest in an audible carbon monoxide detector
  • Don’t buy second-hand appliances
  • Choose appliances that meet British or European safety standards
  • Get a Gas Safe registered engineer to install and check new appliances
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions
  • Have appliances serviced annually
  • Keep portable heaters clear of furniture, bedclothes and curtains
  • Don’t use portable heaters for drying clothes
  • Make sure your living space has adequate ventilation

 

  • Cut off or reduce the supply of fuel at source, wherever possible
  • Call the fire brigade immediately and tell them that LPG is involved

 

  • Check the contents indicator and pressure gauge on the tank, if fitted
  • Turn off the gas tap at each appliance
  • Shut all the valves on the tank/cylinders and the emergency control valve outside your home by turning them clockwise
  • Restrict access to the area
  • Close available valves to isolate the vessel
  • Limit the pressure by spraying with water until the damage can be assessed

LPG characteristics and fire control

Characteristics of LPG

Butane and propane share the following properties:

  • They are vapours at atmospheric temperature and pressure, but are normally stored in their liquid state in steel containers of various shapes and sizes. All LPG storage containers, whether static or mobile, are typically 87% liquid; the remaining 13% vapour allows for expansion
  • LPG, whether in liquid or vapour state, contains no toxic components and is therefore not poisonous. The vapour is, however, slightly anaesthetic when high concentrations are inhaled over a considerable length of time
  • LPG has a high calorific value compared with natural gas
  • The products of LPG combustion are similar to those from natural gas, i.e. carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water vapour
  • Liquid LPG is half the weight of water, volume for volume; it will therefore lie on top of water like oil and petrol
  • Butane vapour is twice the weight of air and propane vapour is one and a half times, volume for volume; LPG vapour will therefore sink to the lowest point and may remain for some time unless efforts are made to disperse it
  • It is possible to store a potentially large volume of LPG vapour in liquid form, in a relatively small container
  • LPG acts as a refrigerant and contains an odourant. Leaks may be detected by signs of cooling at the leak area and by smell, amongst other evidence

Fire control

It’s difficult to have a single procedure that should be followed if LPG containers, bulk tanks or tankers are involved in an accident or fire. However, there are a few general emergency procedures, which you can view at the top of the page, which may be of help in deciding a plan of action; these vary according to whether there is leakage with or without fire.

For further advice, please download the PDF LPG Characteristics and Fire Control.